Small Thing Makes a Big Impact

Posted 20 November 2014 10:03 AM by TCAuthor3

By Carol Ryczek, community relations manager, Shawano Medical Center

If you’ve ever been in a hospital bed, you know how important it is to have your call button within reach. Simple things, like sitting up or going to the bathroom, can get very complicated when you are in a strange bed surrounded by (and sometimes strapped to!) unfamiliar machinery. The nurse call button becomes your ticket to comfort.

A good nurse call system can have a big impact on a patient’s overall hospital experience. It can also help the staff bring care to the patient with the fewest steps—and the least amount of time—possible.  That’s why the new ThedaCare Medical Center-Shawano will have an advanced nurse call system – thanks to the Shawano Medical Center Foundation’s capital campaign. The Foundation agreed to fund Rauland Responder V, which uses wireless technology to send patient requests directly to the person who can help.

The new patient communications system takes the concept of a nurse call button and makes it much more efficient.  It might have started out as a nurse call system, but if it were correctly named, it would be the patient-nurse-lab-imaging-housekeeping-certified nurse assistant-call button. To the patient, though, it would be the one-touch-does-it-all button.

A patient can press one button to ask for help in going to the bathroom, for pain control, or to let a nurse know that an alarm is buzzing. That button will send a text to the patient’s nurse, and she will call the patient to find out exactly what the patient needs.   

The staff can use the new system to coordinate the patient’s care between visits to the Lab, or Imaging Departments. They can let housekeepers know when a room is ready to clean. There are fewer hallway beeps, fewer transfers, and faster responses.

It’s a small thing with a big impact, and it is a good example of how Shawano Medical Center Foundation’s capital campaign will help every patient at ThedaCare Medical Center-Shawano.

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